It's been said that breastmilk is liquid gold.  A month's supply can cost anywhere from $300 up to $1,200 dollars on the internet. If you're a pumping mama, you want to preserve every drop.  

Here are our top 3 ways to store that precious breastmilk:

1- Milk Trays- 
Milkies Milk trays freezes eight 1-ounce "Milk Sticks", allowing you to thaw the exact amount you need for each feeding.  Milk Sticks fit in ALL bottle openings.  Plus, the trays are BPA free.  
 
2- Milk Bags-
Lansinoh Milk Bags are our favorite.  They are leak proof and ideal for storing and freezing breastmilk. The bags lay flat which make storage and thawing efficient.  Plus, you can pump straight into bags to eliminate the need to clean all those bottles and eliminate any chance of spilling.  Just label each bag with the date and number of ounces you've pumped and put in in the freezer.  They have a convenient pour spout so you don't loose any of that precious liquid gold when you go to use it.
 
3-  Breastmilk Storage Bottles-
There are a lot of storage bottles out there, but we love Medela.  If you have a Medela PUmp, you can pump directly into these bottles and stash in your freezer.  They are leakproof and dishwasher safe.  This is the most convenient option because you are pumping directly into the bottle you are freezing and then feeding baby with.   However, if you are storing a lot, these take up much more space. 
 
When pumping and storing breastmilk, it's important to remember the following:
Room Temperature-  Good to use for 4-6 hours
Refrigerator- Good to use for 4-8 days
Freezer- Good to use for 3 Months
Deep Freezer- Good to use for 12 Months
Thawed Milk- Should be used within 24 hours.  
You cannot refreeze breastmilk
 
We would also recommend:

 

 

 

Source: Don’t Shake the Milk by Linda J. Smith, BSE, FACCE, IBCLC

From Kelly Mom:

How likely is this to be an issue? We don’t know! So far there has not been research done on the bioactive properties of shaken vs. non-shaken breastmilk (fun research project – any takers?). Some feel that the forces required to change the milk are significantly more than could be provided via shaking. Others note that shear forces from shaking are not the only issue–bursting of bubbles caused by shaking may also damage cells or denature proteins.

To play it safe, use the smallest amount of force needed to mix the layers, keeping in mind that the layers will mix better as the milk warms. If you do shake the milk, it might not be a problem at all–and even if it turns out that shaking makes a difference it will still be the best nutrition for your child.